Permission sought to demolish historic workhouse building and build flats

The former Strand Union Workhouse building in Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia. Picture: Linus Rees

By Linus Rees A planning application has been submitted to demolish the Middlesex Hospital Annex and former workhouse building in Cleveland Street, Fitzrovia. The site contains the last remaining example of a Georgian workhouse in London but has not been listed. The planning application was submitted to Camden Council last week. The proposal by University College London Hospital NHS Foundation trust is to completely demolish the existing buildings and build 142 flats with some retail premises. The proposed development will consist of a five, six and 10 storey buildings and a mix of private, socially-rented and intermediate housing.

The proposed development is controversial not only because the building is seen as of great historic value but the proposed socially-rented housing on the site falls far short of what local campaigners had hoped for. Much of the socially-rented accommodation proposed on the site has come from a previous planning gain agreement made with Camden Council several years ago. Campaigners have accused the hospital trust of “double counting” the social housing units in order to satisfy a section 106 agreement and other policy requirements.

There will be a public exhibition showing the proposals on Thursday 15 July from 5pm ot 8pm, Friday 16 July from 3pm to 6pm and Saturday 17 July from 10am to 1pm at UCLH Trust Headquarters, 250 Euston Road (foyer area), London, NW1 2PG.

For more information see the planning application on Camden Council’s website. For background to the story see: History is being sacrificed for profit and Hospital amputates affordable housing from workhouse site.

Affordable Housing Viability Report by Jones Lang LaSalle & Savills, which UCLH don’t want anybody to see but which Fitzrovia News in the interests of democracy and transparency think you should see. After all, we got hold of a copy, why shouldn’t the public see it?

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